Jewish dancing master of the Renaissance: Guglielmo Ebreo.
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Jewish dancing master of the Renaissance: Guglielmo Ebreo. by Otto Kinkeldey

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Published by Dance Horizons in Brooklyn .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Guglielmo, Ebreo da Pesaro, ca. 1420-ca.1481.,
  • Dance teachers -- Biography.,
  • Jews -- Biography.,
  • Dance -- History.,
  • Renaissance.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsGV1618 .K5
The Physical Object
Pagination44 p.
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5991705M
LC Control Number66022777

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OCLC Number: Notes: "Second printing " "Reprinted from the A.S. Freidus Memorial volume [Studies in Jewish bibliography and related subjects, in memory of Abraham Solomon Freidus ()] New York, ". Jewish Dancing Master of the Renaissance: Guglielmo Ebreo [Otto Kinkeldey] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. To the lay person, it seems extraordinary that an irrelevant art form would be the provenance of “people of the book,” expected to be cultured, educated, worldly and wise. Yet, an early treatise by Otto Kinkeldey details the teaching of Guglielmo Ebreo, a Jewish Dancing Master of the Renaissance and Barbara Sparti has continued the research. Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro (c. – c. ) was a Jewish Italian dancer and dancing master at some of the most influential courts in Renaissance Italy, including Naples, Urbino, Milan, and byname Ebreo means simply ‘Hebrew.’Not always used when referring to him, da Pesaro indicates that he was from the east-central town of Pesaro.

A Jewish Dancing Master of the Renaissance: Guglielmo Ebreo. by Otto Kinkledy. Dance Horizons 1st Edition from an article originally printed in Condition: Very good. Spine intact, no pencil, no highlighter, covers scuffed. $ Paperback The Book on the Art of Dancing. by Antonio Cornazano. Translation by Madeleine Inglehearn and Peggy. Articles include:"Non-Jewish Motives in the Ornament of Early Hebrew Books" by Joseph Reider"Isaac ibn Shem-Tob's Unknown Commentaries on the Physics and his Other Unknown Works" by Harry Austryn Wolfson"A Jewish Dancing Master of the Renaissance (Guglielmo Ebreo)" by Otto Kinkeldey"The Beginnings of the Study of Hebrew in Scotland" by Geo. F. Source Books: 15thth Century Dancetime Publications owns many rare, hard-to-find books on dance and related cultural life. Below is a list of books for further research. "Jewish Dancing-Masters and 'Jewish Dance' in Renaissance Italy: Guglielmo Ebreo and Beyond. In Seeing Israel and Jewish Dance edited by Judith Brin Ingber. Wayne State University Press. Detroit. Pg. ; Grossman, Avraham. Pious and Rebellious Jewish Women in Medieval Europe. Translated from the Hebrew by Jonathan Chipman.

Summary Note: summary text provided by external source. Fifteenth-century Italy produced the earliest known treatises on the dance. Guglielmo Ebreo, an eminent Jewish dancing master, dedicated his 'On the Practice or Art of Dancing' to the future Sforza duke of Milan in the determination to give dance the status enjoyed by music and other arts andsciences. Guglielmo da Pesaro (see article in Books & Essays) Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro, Liber Ballorum (), Jewish Dancing Masters: The Art that Left the Ghetto by Joanna G. Harris Jews were known to be merchants, musicians and physicians in the 15th and 16th centuries. That is well documented in the various histories of Jewish Venice. But dancing. Guglielmo Ebreo's Little Book on Dancing, A New Edition Ingrid Brainard Guglielmo Ebreo of Pesaro: De pratica seu arte tripudii / On the Practice or Art of Dancing Edited by Barbara Sparti. Illustrated. pp. Musical exx. Oxford: Clarendon Press, Cloth, $ ISBN We have long needed a good edition and English. A Jewish Dancing Master of the Renaissance: Guglielmo Ebreo. By Otto Kinkeldey. [Reprinted from the A. S. Freidus Memorial Volume, New York, ] Brooklyn: Dance Horizons []. [44 p., paper $] Orchesography. A Treatise in the Form of a Dialogue, Whereby All Manner of Persons May Easily Acquire and Practice the Honourable Exercise of.